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Housing and tax policy paper

Published on 01 Jan 10 by Australian Tax Research Foundation

Australia, like many other OECD countries, has a wide variety of taxes, tax reliefs and subsidies for housing. Large tax expenditures for home ownership compared to rental housing bias the housing market. Combined with state taxes on housing, these have serious efficiency and distributional consequences. But home ownership remains the Australian Dream and a key form of saving for households and this presents significant political difficulties in carrying out tax reform.

Housing and Tax Policy brings together leading Australian and international experts to shed new light on these policy roblems. Contributors present new analysis of:

  • the size of tax expenditures for housing and their efficiency,price and distributional impact
  • international experience from the United States and Europe, including new research on how home ownership tax expenditures operate to subsidise excessive borrowing and house price risk
  • reforms needed to state duties and land tax for housing in Australia
  • the impact of taxation, including negative gearing, on the supply of affordable rental housing, and designing reforms to increase accessibility of home ownership.

Author profile:

Prof Miranda Stewart CTA
Miranda is a leading international expert on tax law and policy, and Director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at Crawford School, Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. Professor Stewart has more than 20 years experience working at the leading edge of policy research, design and development. She joined ANU from the University of Melbourne, where she was a Director of Tax Studies for many years. She has previously worked at New York University School of Law in the United States, in major Australian law firms advising business on tax law, and at the ATO advising on business tax law and policy, and has consulted for government on various tax and transfer policy issues. Current at 30 June 2015 Click here to expand/collapse more articles by Miranda STEWART.
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