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Alternative Remuneration - What will it take to keep my employee?

Published on 08 Aug 2007 | Took place at Leonda by the Yarra, Hawthorn , VIC

Many practitioners and small business proprietors believe that an employee can only be remunerated by paying cash as a salary, the usual fringe benefits or with shares. The rules in Division 13A of the Tax Law are complex and well-known. But are these the only ways in which an employee can be paid?

This seminar examined the alternative ways in which an employee can be remunerated.

It covered not only the present rules of Division 13A but also discussed and considered other ways in which an employee can be remunerated such as implementing unit trust schemes, bonus plans, employer loans, and other benefits.

Naturally, all taxation and FBT issues were explored in detail providing a considered view of the most suitable arrangements that can be implement, the advantages and pitfalls.

Get a 20% discount when you buy all the items from this event.

Individual sessions

Employee remuneration strategies - employee equity

Author(s):  Paul O'BRIEN The focus of this paper is to examine the use of equity instruments as a means of attracting and retaining employees. It examines current trends in the use of equity instruments and their varying effectiveness as a reward and retention tool. It also analyses the taxation implications of common forms of employee equity and the benefits that the various instruments can provide to employees, as well as comparing the various equity instruments.

Materials from this session:

Alternative remuneration - what will it take to keep my employee?

Author(s):  Paul HOCKRIDGE Traditional wisdom has it that an employee's remuneration package might be comprised of some or all of salary, plus superannuation, plus one or more cars, plus one portable computer per annum, plus salary sacrifice of holding costs of jointly held investments, plus a range of other exempt or concessional benefits, plus loans with a promise of an ETP rather than bonuses, plus shares or rights under an employee share scheme, plus entitlements under phantom equity arrangements – by whatever name. This paper briefly touches all the alternatives except employee share schemes and draws out in particular the benefits of phantom equity type arrangements, by whatever name.

Materials from this session: